Monthly Dividend Income: October 2014

My favorite post to write each month. :) This is when I get to share all my dividend income for the previous month. These dividends are what I’ll eventually use to live off of when I become financially independent.

I share these figures along with monthly income/expenses to not only track my progress towards financial independence but also to hopefully show others that it is possible to get started with dividend growth investing with a low income. The hardest part is weathering the first few years of small dividend payments and allow the compounding snowball to get rolling.

Here is October’s dividend income from my 3 stock investment accounts: Roth IRA, Loyal3, and Taxable Brokerage. I automatically reinvest all dividends in my Roth and taxable brokerage and selectively reinvest dividends, combining them with fresh capital every month or two, in the Loyal3 account. Note: I recently made the switch to dripping all dividends in my taxable account but due to a broker error, the change didn’t end up taking effect until the beginning of November. Mostly my fault, as I didn’t monitor my portfolio too closely over the month of October.

Roth IRA

Coca-Cola (KO): $4.40-reinvested into .105 shares @ $41.91 per share.

Realty Income (O): $2.89-reinvested into .067 shares @ $42.89 per share.

General Electric (GE): $5.91-reinvested into .233 shares @ $25.38 per share.

Loyal3

Coca-Cola (KO): $8.08

Dr. Pepper Snapple (DPS): $1.38

Taxable Brokerage

Altria (MO): $3.64

Phillip Morris (PM): $22.00

Realty Income (O): $19.96

General Electric (GE): $1.76

October Total: $70.02. As expected, October was a lighter month for dividend income but still managed to increase the amount over last October from $23.99. With two months left in 2014, I’ve now received $696.43 in dividend income and estimated forward 12 month dividends now stands at $1,131.29.

 

Full Disclosure: I am long all stocks mentioned. This post is not intended to be a buy or sell recommendation for any stock mentioned and is for entertainment/educational uses only.

How was your October for dividend income (or portfolio gains for any growth investors)? Share below with a comment and thanks for reading!

October 2014 Balance Sheet

Today I’ll be sharing my personal balance sheet, listing all of my assets and liabilities to figure out what my current net worth is. Tracking your net worth is a good exercise in my opinion since it provides you a quick snapshot of your financial life.

Overall October was an okay month with a small gain. Considering most of the losses were due to an expense heavy month being on vacation with family and the continued value decline of my car, I’ll take it. Note: the +/- after each category total represents the change only from the prior month.

Assets

Emergency Fund: $4502.51 (+0.37). Thinking about possibly dropping this amount down a bit to free up some money to invest with over the next few months. Having 6 months of expenses saved up is nice but with a steady job working for Uncle Sam and very low interest rates, it’d be nice to be able to put some of this money to work.

Cash Savings: $2975.96 (-831.91).

Roth IRA: $13,186.12 (+343.87). After maxing out this account earlier in the summer, it’s just riding the ups and downs of the market at this point along with dripping dividends.

Brokerage: $15,166.03 (+1932.22). Bought some more KMI, rest is due to market gains.

Loyal3: $3365.81 (+32.39).

Thrift Savings Plan: $1661.10 (+109.73). I started contributing a small portion of my paycheck to the TSP in March, splitting my contributions between a S&P 500 and a small-cap stock index fund. This is the one portfolio where I’m investing primarily for total return as these funds do not pay dividends. However, they do have some of the lowest expense ratios you can find in a retirement plan.

Auto Worth: $4316.00 (-318.00). The value of my ‘ole Chevy sedan continues to slowly decline as to be expected. The only reason I include it here is that is is the one non-financial “asset” that if I ever needed to sell, could probably get close to its market value. Also a nice reminder each month to not think of cars as an investment.

Assets Total: $45,173.53 (+1,268.67).

Liabilities

Credit Cards: $833.25 (+422.40). As I never carry a balance on my cards and the billing cycles ends in the middle of each month, this is simply my current balance at the end of the month. Like a lot of personal finance bloggers, I’m only in it for the rewards! ;)

Net Worth: $44,340.28 (+846.27). Overall a solid month, especially after a lot of expenses.

 

How was your October for finances? Do you track your net worth and if so, are there any other items you track? Share below with a comment and thanks for reading!

Monthly Investing Recaps: October 2014

At the start of each month I detail all the buy/sell activity here for each of my 3 individual stock portfolios: Loyal3, Roth IRA, and Taxable Brokerage accounts. It’s just one way I am chronicling my journey to financial independence here at Starting From Zero.

In addition to these 3 accounts, I also continued investing in my Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) again this month. Right now I’m contributing 4% of my base pay but may adjust this in the future. The majority of my investing will still be in my taxable and Roth accounts. The TSP is basically a 401k plan for federal employees including the military. It only offers index funds but does have probably the lowest expense ratios around, even lower than Vanguard. Right now I’m putting my contributions in the C Fund which mirrors the S&P 500 and the S Fund which is a small cap index fund. Since these deposits typically take a while to reach my account, I won’t be detailing those transactions here.

Loyal3 Account

Buys

.528 shares of McDonalds (MCD) @ $94.69 per share=$50 invested.

Quick Hits: Although I wasn’t able to buy MCD at its low mid-month, I added some more to this position at a decent valuation.

 

Roth IRA

No activity this month.

Quick Hits: Contribution limit maxed out until next year.

 

Taxable Brokerage

Buys

38 shares of Kinder Morgan (KMI) @ $38.92 per share=$1487.91 invested including commission.

Quick Hits: With KMI set up for projected 10% annual dividend growth over the next few years, I decided to double my position in the energy giant. Although I ended up raising my cost basis here, I still think KMI presents good value here when factoring in the upcoming consolidation of Kinder Morgan Partners (KMP) and Kinder Morgan Management (KMR) under KMI.

 

Full Disclosure: I am long all stocks mentioned. This post is not intended to be a buy or sell recommendation for any stock mentioned and is intended for educational/entertainment purposes only.

How was your October for investing? What do you think of my stock picks this month? Share with a comment below and thank you for reading!

Income/Expense Report: October 2014

As I do every month, I’m sharing all of my income and expenses this month in hopes of being as open as I can about my finances here to chronicle my journey to financial independence. Keeping my expenses low each month will allow me to have more money to set aside and invest in high quality, dividend growth stocks that I will use to reach financial independence. I hope that by sharing these monthly updates I can also prove that it is possible to take control of your financial life and invest a high percentage of your income, even on a small salary.

So how’d I do in October? Not so great, but I knew coming into it that October would be an expense heavy month with a cross-country road trip and 3 weeks visiting family and friends back home. Managed to still spend less than what I took home, but no where close to my 50% savings rate goal. That’s okay though since I usually only get to go home once every year or so and I had plenty of cash built up so I could still make some regular stock buys.

So here’s how it all broke down:

Income

Job Income: $2636.51.

Expenses

Rent/Utilities: $532.53. Rent is $500 a month and I’m also responsible for the electric bill which includes heating costs. So far seems to be running between $30-40 a month. We’ll see how much this increases with cold weather coming up very soon.

Renter’s Insurance: $0. I decided to pay this all up front just to take care of it for the next 6 months in July.

Food/Drinks: $139.50. A lot of cheap beer plus my share of the grocery bill while staying with my parents while on vacation.

Dining Out/Fast-Food: $175.85.

Household/Personal Expenses: $326.86. Took advantage of the time being home to take care of some small home improvement projects around my Mom’s new house that needed to get done before winter. Also a pretty good excuse to buy some more power tools (insert Tim the Tool Man’s grunting noise here.) :)

Gas: $810.59. That’s what over an over 5000 mile round trip across the U.S will do to you, plus a lot of driving around while I was at home. Non road-trip expenses, my gas total came to $114.59. Going forward I’d like to keep this to about $40-50 a month, not including any travel for weekend trips, vacation, etc.

Auto Insurance: $0. Switched to liability in July after the recommendations of several people here in the blogging community, cutting my monthly bill down to less than $40 a month. Decided to just pay for the remainder of this year so I don’t have to worry about it until January.

Car Maintenance: $66.94. A couple oil changes for the car.

Phone: $43.86. Been looking at various other options, but with the limited service choices in my area and having gotten used to having a smart phone, I’ll be sticking with Net10 for the forseeable future. Still not a bad deal, compared to the monthly rates companies like Verizon charge for their contacts.

Internet: $54.99.

Entertainment: $7.99. Good ole Netflix.

Donation: $25.00. This will be a new monthly category here as I’ve decided to donate $25 a month to start off to Child Fund International, a great charity that my family has been donating to for quite a while and I’ve donated to randomly over the last few years. This month and going forward I’m donating to their “Essentials for Survival” fund which provides basic necessities like access to water, food and healthcare to children around the world.

Other: $367.09. Lots of money spent in tolls (thank you Illinois and New York ;) ) plus some motel rooms along the way, and misc. expenses while I was home.

 

Total Expenses: $2551.20.

Expense Rate: 97%

Savings Rate: 3%

How did you do in October, did you meet all of your budgeting goals?

October Recap

Wow, what a crazy month! Huge market swings, lots of earnings reports, and major negativity surrounding the markets. Even after all the crazy (often irrational) market movements, the Dow closed October by hitting an all-time high of 17,390. Good thing I’m an investor and not a trader, and can ignore short-term market noise like this past month and instead just focus on continuing to save a large amount of my income and purchase income producing dividend growth stocks.

On a personal note, I am back home after taking a cross country road trip and visiting family and friends for the past three weeks. I had a great time as I was able to see people back home for the first time in several years. Nothing like a little time off once in a while to be able to relax. Now its time to get back to work and get back to some regular blogging updates as well.

Today I’d like to highlight some of the recent news from companies in my portfolio and watchlist.

Kinder Morgan (KMI)

The energy giant announced a 2.3% increase to its quarterly dividend from .43 to .44 per share. With expected 10% dividend growth moving forward as the Kinder Morgan companies consolidate under one umbrella, KMI, I really like the stock as a long-term holding and recently added some more shares to my portfolio.

Visa (V)

The global payment processing company reported strong 4th quarter earnings that has since sent the stock soaring to new highs. Glad I managed to add some more shares in September around $213 a share and didn’t wait. 4th quarter EPS of $2.18 beat estimates by $0.08 while revenue jumped 8.8% year over year. Payment volume grew 11% to a staggering $1.2 Trillion dollars. With China announcing recently that they are opening their market for clearing domestic bank card transactions, Visa looks primed to continued growing revenues, EPS, and dividends at a strong pace going forward.

Realty Income (O)

The monthly dividend paying company announced 3rd quarter Funds from Operations of .64 per share which missed estimates by .01. Revenue beat estimates and showed 16.6% growth from last year. If I wasn’t so heavily weighted in O (accounts for 23% of my projected annual dividend income), I’d probably pick up at some more shares here in the low $40’s.

International Business Machines (IBM)

What a month for IBM. And not in a particularly good way. Revenue growth continues to stagnate as the blue chip technology company reported a 4% decline in revenues for the 3rd quarter and abandoned their previous goal of $20 in EPS for 2015. In all fairness, the EPS was established by a previous CEO. However, EPS growth continues, albeit at a slower than expected pace as the company has begun focusing on improving and growing its business in key segments with an eye towards the future. From CEO Ginni Rometty on her company’s results, “We again performed well in our strategic growth areas cloud, data and analytics, security, social and mobile-where we continue to shift our business. We will accelerate this transformation.”

IBM also provided guidance for 2015 EPS which falls in  a range of $15.97 to $16.30. Applying a P/E of 13 which is where IBM has traded historically, we can come up with a fair value of $207.61 based on the low end of guidance. IBM also added another $5 Billion to their share buyback plan. While the lack of revenue growth is disappointing, I like that the company is aggressively buying back stock, cutting costs, and increasing margins in order to continue growing profits. IBM is a company in transition as they shed old businesses and focus their efforts in faster growing segments like the cloud. While it won’t happen overnight, I think IBM will turn things around and get revenue growing again in the future. Since the dividend is still well covered by earnings, I’m content to just collect the dividend and let it reinvest at low share prices in the meantime.

Aflac (AFL)

The insurer and dividend champion reported so-so numbers for its 3rd quarter report, earning $1.51 in profits missing estimates by 8 cents a share. Revenue beat estimates but still came in slightly lower than last year by 2.5%. Aflac also announced a 5.4% increase in their quarterly dividend to $0.39 a share and increased the size of their buyback plan from $1 billion to $1.2 billion which I like since it shows management is being smart when it comes to buying back stock on cheap valuations. The company also announced it plans to have a $1.3 billion buyback plan for 2015. Currency issues continue to hamper the company but with a low payout ratio, Aflac is set up to weather times like this without risks of dividend cuts or freezes. With the stock hitting 52 week lows, now may be a good time to add to or initiate a position in the company.

Disney (DIS)

Disney is a stock I’ve been looking at recently after reading a write-up by fellow blogger Brian over at Long Term Mindset. Disney recently announced a large slate of new Marvel movies that are expected to be released over the next 4 years.

Check out the list:
The Avengers 3-split into 2 parts in May 2018 and May 2019
Captain America: Serpent Society in May 2016
Doctor Strange in November 2016
Guardians of the Galaxy 2 in May 2015
Thor: Ragnarok in July 2017
Black Panther in November 2017
Captain Marvel in July 2018
Inhumans in November 2018

Pretty impressive, especially since this doesn’t even include the Lucasfilm Star Wars movies (the third trilogy of Episodes 7, 8, and 9 plus spinoff movies) which I am looking forward to as both an investor and Star Wars fan. Although DIS seems to always trade at a premium valuation, I’ve been coming around lately to the idea that this premium is deserved due to their strong growth prospects. I may start dollar cost averaging into a position via Loyal3 soon.

BP

Announced a 2.6% increase to their quarterly dividend to $0.60. While a relatively small increase, I’ll take it as BP’s high starting yield helps make up for it. The stock continues to trade at an attractive valuation compared to their peers and is on my shortlist for portfolio purchases after its recent pullback to the low $40’s. While its easy to get caught up in all the negativity surrounding the company regarding lawsuits over their oil spill, the company is still generating large profits and remains committed to steadily increasing their dividend.

J. M. Smucker (SJM)

Announced a 5 million share increase to their buyback program, bringing their total authorized buyback plan to 10 million shares which will retire about 10% of the company’s outstanding stock if fully executed. How cool is that? Another stock on my short list (I feel like I’ve said that a lot today, so many great stocks, so little capital! ;) ), I’d prefer to buy it near the 17 P/E mark but may initiate a position sometime during the last quarter of this year or early 2015 if shares continue to trade around 19 times earnings.

 

Disclosure: I am long KMI, V, O, IBM, AFL, and BP and may initiate positions in DIS and SJM in the coming weeks/months.

How about your portfolio and watchlists? Any important news or events this month?

Income/Expense Report: September 2014

As I do every month, I’m sharing all of my income and expenses this month in hopes of being as open as I can about my finances here to chronicle my journey to financial independence. Keeping my expenses low each month will allow me to have more money to set aside and invest in high quality, dividend growth stocks that I will use to reach financial independence. I hope that by sharing these monthly updates I can also prove that it is possible to take control of your financial life and invest a high percentage of your income, even on a small salary.

So how’d I do in September? Pretty good, making it the second straight month of being able to save 50% of my net income. Since I spent most of this month in school finishing up a leadership course for work, I didn’t have a whole lot of time for anything else which definitely helped keep expenses down.

So here’s how it all broke down:

Income

Job Income: $2636.51.

Expenses

Rent/Utilities: $538.05. Rent is $500 a month and I’m also responsible for the electric bill which includes heating costs. So far seems to be running between $30-40 a month.

Renter’s Insurance: $0. I decided to pay this all up front just to take care of it for the next 6 months in July.

Food/Drinks: $246.88. After one of my lower spending months in August, this category jumped up quite a bit as I stocked up on a lot of staple items. Trying to get better at cooking cheaper meals going forward.

Dining Out/Fast-Food: $33.10.

Household/Personal Expenses: $83.08.

Clothing/Shoes: $94.20. Some more misc. uniform items for work.

Gas: $80.00. Sadly the days of $20 or under gas months is over with me living further away from work now. Going forward I’d like to keep this to about $40-50 a month, not including any travel for weekend trips, vacation, etc.

Auto Insurance: $0. Switched to liability in July after the recommendations of several people here in the blogging community, cutting my monthly bill down to less than $40 a month. Decided to just pay for the remainder of this year so I don’t have to worry about it until January.

Car Maintenance: $13.99. One headlight bulb for the car.

Phone: $43.86. Been looking at various other options, but with the limited service choices in my area and having gotten used to having a smart phone, I’ll be sticking with Net10 for the forseeable future. Still not a bad deal, compared to the monthly rates companies like Verizon charge for their contacts.

Internet: $54.99.

Entertainment: $7.99. Good ole Netflix.

Donation: $28.00. This will be a new monthly category here as I’ve decided to donate $25 a month to start off to Child Fund International, a great charity that my family has been donating to for quite a while and I’ve donated randomly to over the last few years. This month and going forward I’m donating to their “Essentials for Survival” fund which provides basic necessities like access to water, food and healthcare to children around the world.

Other: $17.96.

 

Total Expenses: $1242.10.

Expense Rate: 47%

Savings Rate: 53%

How did you do in September, did you meet all of your budgeting goals?

September 2014 Balance Sheet

Today I’ll be sharing my personal balance sheet, listing all of my assets and liabilities to figure out what my current net worth is. Tracking your net worth is a good exercise in my opinion since it provides you a quick snapshot of your financial life.

Overall September was an okay month with a small gain. Considering most of the losses were due to lower stock prices, allowing me to invest new money at lower prices (and higher yields!), I’m not complaining. :) Note: the +/- after each category total represents the change only from the prior month.

Assets

Emergency Fund: $4502.14 (+0). No interest this month as my bank paid it out a day late for some reason. Thinking about possibly dropping this amount down a bit to free up some money to invest with over the next few months. Having 6 months of expenses saved up is nice but with a steady job working for Uncle Sam and very low interest rates, it’d be nice to be able to put some of this money to work.

Cash Savings: $3807.87 (-237.93).

Roth IRA: $12,842.25 (-365.33). After maxing out this account earlier in the summer, it’s just riding the ups and downs of the market at this point along with dripping dividends.

Brokerage: $13,233.81 (+1107.19). Added to this account this month with about $1500 in new money invested.

Loyal3: $3333.42 (+243.04).

Thrift Savings Plan: $1551.37 (+55.39). I started contributing a small portion of my paycheck to the TSP in March, splitting my contributions between a S&P 500 and a small-cap stock index fund. This is the one portfolio where I’m investing primarily for total return as these funds do not pay dividends. However, they do have some of the lowest expense ratios you can fund in a retirement plan.

Auto Worth: $4634.00 (-206.00). The value of my ‘ole Chevy sedan continues to slowly decline as to be expected. The only reason I include it here is that is is the one non-financial “asset” that if I ever needed to sell, could probably get close to its market value. Also a nice reminder each month to not think of cars as an investment.

Assets Total: $43,904.86 (+596.36).

Liabilities

Credit Cards: $410.85 (+134.40). As I never carry a balance on my cards and the billing cycles ends in the middle of each month, this is simply my current balance at the end of the month. Like a lot of personal finance bloggers, I’m only in it for the rewards! ;)

Net Worth: $43,494.01 (+461.96).

 

How was your September for finances? Do you track your net worth and if so, are there any other items you track? Share below with a comment and thanks for reading!

Monthly Dividend Income: September 2014

My favorite post to write each month. :) This is when I get to share all my dividend income for the previous month. These dividends are what I’ll eventually use to live off of when I become financially independent.

I share these figures along with monthly income/expenses to not only track my progress towards financial independence but also to hopefully show others that it is possible to get started with dividend growth investing with a low income. The hardest part is weathering the first few years of small dividend payments and allow the compounding snowball to get rolling.

Here is September’s dividend income from my 3 stock investment accounts: Roth IRA, Loyal3, and Taxable Brokerage. I automatically reinvest all dividends in my Roth and taxable brokerage and selectively reinvest dividends, combining them with fresh capital every month or two, in the Loyal3 account. Note: I only recently made the switch to dripping all dividends in my taxable account so that change won’t take effect until mid-September.

Roth IRA

Aflac (AFL): $8.19-reinvested into .133 shares @ $61.50 per share.

Visa (V): $2.81-reinvested into .013 shares @ $214.91 per share.

Chevron (CVX): $11.06-reinvested into .087 shares @ $126.82 per share.

Realty Income (O): $2.88-reinvested into .065 shares @ $44.19 per share.

Royal Dutch Shell Class B (RDSB): $13.16-reinvested into .166 shares @ $79.40 per share.

Loyal3

Target (TGT): $8.50

McDonalds (MCD): $4.67

Taxable Brokerage

Wal-Mart (WMT): $0.96

IBM (IBM): $9.90

Chevron (CVX): $5.35

Target (TGT): $1.04

Realty Income (O): $19.92

BP (BP): $9.95

September Total: $98.39. Getting soooo close to breaking that $100 mark! ;) I thought I might reach it this month, but fell just short. At my current dividend income rate, I can now consistently cover my car insurance and cell phone bell each month which feels pretty awesome. With recent additions to my small McDonald’s position I should be hitting $100 for the first time in December when all these companies payout again.

 

Full Disclosure: I am long all stocks mentioned. This post is not intended to be a buy or sell recommendation for any stock mentioned and is for entertainment/educational uses only.

How was your September for dividend income (or portfolio gains for any growth investors)? Share below with a comment and thanks for reading!

Monthly Investing Recaps: September 2014

At the start of each month I detail all the buy/sell activity here for each of my 3 individual stock portfolios: Loyal3, Roth IRA, and Taxable Brokerage accounts. It’s just one way I am chronicling my journey to financial independence here at Starting From Zero.

In addition to these 3 accounts, I also continued investing in my Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) again this month. Right now I’m contributing 4% of my base pay but may adjust this in the future. The majority of my investing will still be in my taxable and Roth accounts. The TSP is basically a 401k plan for federal employees including the military. It only offers index funds but does have probably the lowest expense ratios around, even lower than Vanguard. Right now I’m putting my contributions in the C Fund which mirrors the S&P 500 and the S Fund which is a small cap index fund. Since these deposits typically take a while to reach my account, I won’t be detailing those transactions here.

Loyal3 Account

Buys

.1064 shares of McDonalds (MCD) @ $93.90 per share=$10 invested. After accumulating over $10 in my account for the first time this past month from dividends, I used the money to add some McDonalds stock.

1.5912 shares of McDonalds (MCD) @ $94.26 per share=$150 invested.

Quick Hits: With much of my time this month occupied with school and then a very busy couple weeks of work, I only made a few small purchases this month through Loyal3. With slowing revenue growth and a smaller than expected dividend increase this year, MCD has fallen into what I consider fair value for the dividend champion and I plan on continuing to dollar cost average into the stock below ~96 per share.

 

Roth IRA

No activity this month.

 

Taxable Brokerage

Buys

7 shares of Visa (V) @ $213.47 per share=$1503.24 invested including commission.

Quick Hits: With Visa pulling back below $215 this past month I felt like the stock presented a good value so I doubled my position in the global payment processing company, slightly raising my cost basis. With its excellent balance sheet, low payout ratio, and high earnings per share growth, Visa looks primed to continue their high dividend growth going forward.

 

Full Disclosure: I am long all stocks mentioned. This post is not intended to be a buy or sell recommendation for any stock mentioned and is intended for educational/entertainment purposes only.

How was your September for investing? What do you think of my stock picks this month? Share with a comment below and thank you for reading!

Monthly Dividend Income: August 2014

My favorite post to write each month. :) This is when I get to share all my dividend income for the previous month. These dividends are what I’ll eventually use to live off of when I become financially independent.

I share these figures along with monthly income/expenses to not only track my progress towards financial independence but also to hopefully show others that it is possible to get started with dividend growth investing with a low income. The hardest part is weathering the first few years of small dividend payments and allow the compounding snowball to get rolling.

Here is August’s dividend income from my 3 stock investment accounts: Roth IRA, Loyal3, and Taxable Brokerage. I automatically reinvest all dividends in my Roth and taxable brokerage and selectively reinvest dividends, combining them with fresh capital every month or two, in the Loyal3 account. Note: I only recently made the switch to dripping all dividends in my taxable account so that change won’t take effect until mid-September.

Roth IRA

AT&T (T): $12.44-reinvested into .348 shares @ $35.65 per share.

Deere (DE): $13.80-reinvested into .162 shares @ $85.04 per share.

Realty Income: $2.86-reinvested into .064 shares @ $44.69 per share.

Kinder Morgan Inc. (KMI): $14.35-reinvested into .347 shares @$41.36 per share.

Apple (AAPL): $6.79-reinvested into .07 shares @ $96.32 per share.

Loyal3

No dividends this month.

Taxable Brokerage

AT&T: $18.86

Realty Income (O): $19.92

August Total: $89.02. :) Nice increase from May’s total of $74.46 and a huge increase year over year from 2013 when I only made $18.47 in August. Amazing how quickly dividends can start adding up with regular stock purchases.

 

Full Disclosure: I am long all stocks mentioned. This post is not intended to be a buy or sell recommendation for any stock mentioned and is for entertainment/educational uses only.

How was your August for dividend income (or portfolio gains for any growth investors)? Share below with a comment and thanks for reading!