Tag Archives: tgt

Monthly Investing Recaps: August 2014

At the start of each month I detail all the buy/sell activity here for each of my 3 individual stock portfolios: Loyal3, Roth IRA, and Taxable Brokerage accounts. It’s just one way I am chronicling my journey to financial independence here at Starting From Zero.

In addition to these 3 accounts, I also continued investing in my Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) again this month. Right now I’m contributing 4% of my base pay but may adjust this in the future. The majority of my investing will still be in my taxable and Roth accounts. The TSP is basically a 401k plan for federal employees including the military. It only offers index funds but does have probably the lowest expense ratios around, even lower than Vanguard. Right now I’m putting my contributions in the C Fund which mirrors the S&P 500 and the S Fund which is a small cap index fund. Since these deposits typically take a while to reach my account, I won’t be detailing those transactions here.

Loyal3 Account

Buys

1.0686 shares of McDonalds (MCD) @ $93.58 per share.

.5314 shares of McDonalds (MCD) @ $94.10 per share.

1.0668 shares of McDonalds (MCD) @ $93.73 per share.

2.5164 shares of Coca-Cola (KO) @ $39.74 per share.

.8351 shares of Target (TGT) @ $59.87 per share.

1.3354 shares of Wal-Mart (WMT) @ $74.88 per share.

1.3204 shares of Wal-Mart (WMT) @ $75.74 per share.

Quick Hits: With too much time spent on school work this past month, I only made some small purchases through this account throughout the month. I plan on continuing to dollar cost average into KO anytime the stock dips below $40. With WMT, MCD and TGT all presenting good value at different times throughout the month I also continued dollar cost averaging into those stocks.

 

Roth IRA

Sells

.539 shares of RDSA @ 80.54 per share=$43.41. Realized gain of $4.71.

Quick Hits: I currently hold both my taxable brokerage and Roth IRA through my bank’s brokerage service. They recently  converted their brokerage service to a separate company and any holdings that were less than 1 share were automatically sold. Since dividends from Royal Dutch Shell’s class B shares (RDSB) can only be reinvested into class A shares (RDSA), this is how I ended up with a a fractional amount.

 

Taxable Brokerage

No activity this month.

 

Full Disclosure: I am long MCD, KO, TGT, WMT and RDSB. This post is not intended to be a buy or sell recommendation for any stock mentioned and is intended for educational/entertainment purposes only.

How was your August for investing? What do you think of my stock picks this month? Share with a comment below and thank you for reading!

June 2014 Balance Sheet

Today I’ll be sharing my personal balance sheet, listing all of my assets and liabilities to figure out what my current net worth is. Tracking your net worth is a good exercise in my opinion since it provides you a quick snapshot of your financial life.

Overall June was a solid month, continuing to increase my net worth by more than the amount I’m saving each month. Just shows you what happens when you use your money to buy cash producing assets. Note: the +/- after each category total represents the change only from the prior month.

Assets

Emergency Fund: $4501.38 (.37). Yay for interest! 😉

Cash Savings: $4854.53 (-1277.72). One large order of Deere stock will do that for ya. The majority of the rest is set aside for all the up-front expenses moving off-base will incur: security deposit, furniture, etc.

Roth IRA: $13,169.64 (+2476.72). Added 23 shares of Deere (DE).

Brokerage: $10,851.84 (+243.49). Just following the ups and downs of the market at this point. With my Roth now maxed out for the year, I’ll start adding to this account once again.

Loyal3: $2479.68 (+451.12). Added to my position in Target (TGT) and opened a new one in Dr. Pepper Snapple (DPS).

Thrift Savings Plan: $1305.38 (+128.53). I started contributing a small portion of my paycheck to the TSP in March, splitting my contributions between a S&P 500 and a small-cap stock index fund. This is the one portfolio where I’m investing primarily for total return as these funds do not pay dividends. However, they do have some of the lowest expense ratios you can fund in a retirement plan.

Auto Worth: $5298.00 (-418). I guess the market or Kelly Blue Book anyways doesn’t like 10 year old Chevy’s. The only reason I include it here is that is is the one non-financial “asset” that if I ever needed to sell, could probably get close to its market value. Also a nice reminder each month to not think of cars as an investment.

Assets Total: $42,485.45 (+1604.51).

Liabilities

Credit Cards: $93.13 (-131.08). As I never carry a balance on my cards and the billing cycles ends in the middle of each month, this is simply my current balance at the end of the month. Like a lot of personal finance bloggers, I’m only in it for the rewards! 😉

Net Worth: $42,392.32 (+1735.59). Back on track after an expense heavy May ate into my returns.

 

Disclosure: I am long DE, TGT, and DPS.

How was your June for finances? Do you track your net worth and if so, are there any other items you track? Share below with a comment and thanks for reading!

 

 

Monthly Dividend Income: June 2014

My favorite post to write each month. 🙂 This is when I get to share all my dividend income for the previous month. These dividends are what I’ll eventually use to live off of when I become financially independent.

I share these figures along with monthly income/expenses to not only track my progress towards financial independence but also to hopefully show others that it is possible to get started with dividend growth investing with a low income. The hardest part is weathering the first few years of small dividend payments and allow the compounding snowball to get rolling.

Here is June’s dividend income from my 3 stock investment accounts: Roth IRA, Loyal3, and Taxable Brokerage. I automatically reinvest all dividends in my Roth and selectively reinvest dividends, combining them with fresh capital every month or two, in my other accounts.

Roth IRA

Aflac (AFL): $8.14-reinvested into .132 shares @ $61.33 per share.

Visa (V): $2.80-reinvested into .013 shares @ $211.80 per share.

Chevron (CVX): $10.97-reinvested into .087 shares @ $124.77 per share.

Realty Income (O): $2.84-reinvested into .065 shares @ $43.67 per share.

Royal Dutch Shell Class B and Class A (RDSB and RDSA): $13.51-reinvested into .171 shares of RDSA @ $78.90 per share.

Loyal3

Target (TGT): $5.55

McDonald’s (MCD): $2.51

Taxable Brokerage

Wal-Mart (WMT): $0.96

Chevron (CVX): $5.35

IBM (IBM): $9.90

Target (TGT): $0.86

Realty Income (O): $19.89

BP (BP): $9.95

June Total: $93.23. Getting so close to that $100 mark! Maybe in September when all these companies pay out again. 😉 At the half-way mark of the year I’ve now earned $387.93 for the year.

 

Full Disclosure: I am long WMT, CVX, IBM, TGT, O, BP, AFL, V, RDSB, RDSA, and MCD. This post is not intended to be a buy or sell recommendation for any stock mentioned and is for entertainment/educational uses only.

How was your June for dividend income (or portfolio gains for any growth investors)? Share below with a comment and thanks for reading!

Monthly Investing Recaps: June 2014

At the start of each month I detail all the buy/sell activity here for each of my 3 individual stock portfolios: Loyal3, Roth IRA, and Taxable Brokerage accounts. It’s just one way I am chronicling my journey to financial independence here at Starting From Zero.

In addition to these 3 accounts, I also continued investing in my Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) again this month. Right now I’m contributing 4% of my base pay but may adjust this in the future. The majority of my investing will still be in my taxable and Roth accounts. The TSP is basically a 401k plan for federal employees including the military. It only offers index funds but does have probably the lowest expense ratios around, even lower than Vanguard. Right now I’m putting my contributions in the C Fund which mirrors the S&P 500 and the S Fund which is a small cap index fund. Since these deposits typically take a while to reach my account, I won’t be detailing those transactions here.

After not investing any new funds in May, I pooled all the cash I had and made one final purchase for my Roth IRA for the year and used the excess to make some smaller purchases through Loyal3.

Loyal3 Account

Buys

3.43 shares of Target (TGT) @ $58.31 per share.

3.3624 shares of Dr. Pepper Snapple (DPS) @ $59.48 per share.

Sells

None.

Quick Hits: With Target continuing to trade at an attractive long-term entry point and recently announcing a 20.9% dividend increase, this dividend champion was a no-brainer to add to.

Dr. Pepper is a new position for my portfolio. DPS is a manufacturer and distributor of non-alcoholic beverages that are sold in the United States, Canada, and Mexico. The company’s brands include its flagship Dr. Pepper and Snapple drinks, Sunkist soda, 7UP, A&W, Canada Dry, Crush soda, Hawiian Punch, Mott’s, Schweppes, and my personal favorite as a kid, Yoohoo. Unlike its main competitors, Coca-Cola and Pepsi, both of which are trading at P/E’s of 19+, Dr. Pepper’s P/E comes in at 17.5 with a forward P/E of 15.2, both of which are less than the S&P 500′s current and forward P/E ratios of 18.3 and 17 respectively. Although they have only been growing their dividend for 5 years, the stock does sport dividend growth rates of 10.4% for the past year, and 22.8% average for the last three years while still keeping the payout ratio at 47%.

Roth IRA

Buys

23 shares of Deere (DE) @ $91.80 per share.

Sells

None.

Quick Hits: Deere is another new position for my portfolio and one I’ve been looking to add for a while now. Growing up in a rural town and with plenty of farmers and other users of Deere tractors and equipment in my family, I guess I have a soft spot for the stock. Although earnings are expected to decrease in the coming few years, I like the long-term growth story of this company which is summed up nicely at their investor page. After keeping their dividend static for five quarters, Deere recently announced a 17.6% increase, bringing the quarterly payout up to $0.60 from $0.51. Sweet. :) Even after the recent run-up in price the stock continues to trade at an attractive valuation with a P/E of just 9.9.

Taxable Brokerage

No activity this month.

 

Full Disclosure: I am long TGT, DPS, DE, and KO. This post is not intended to be a buy or sell recommendation for any stock mentioned and is intended for educational/entertainment purposes only.

How was your June for investing? What do you think of my stock picks this month? Share with a comment below and thank you for reading!

Mulling Over Investment Options

After not investing any new capital in May for a variety of reasons, I’ve now built up a decent little stash of cash ready to be deployed into quality dividend growth stocks that will provide me with a reliable source of passive income going forward.

So what to buy? Looking over my watch list, I struggled to come up with any ideas for a while. Seems like the majority of them are overvalued. Can we please just have a market correction already? 😉

But I figured I’d find some candidates eventually and after going through my list again and looking at other blogs and investing sites, this is what I came up with.

J. M. Smucker Company (SJM)-This dividend contender with 16 years of dividend growth was founded in 1897 and operates in the consumer staples sector. Although a name like Smucker makes you think of grape jelly, the J.M. Smucker Company’s largest business segment is in the brew at home coffee industry which was bolstered by their acquisition of the Folger’s brand in 2008. Smucker is the market leader in the brew at home coffee industry here in the United States and also holds the number one brand in the $2 billion a year peanut butter industry, Jif. Coffee makes up 48% of sales, which is way ahead of their number two product, peanut butter, at 13%. The company’s namesake fruit spreads only account for 6% of all product sales as of 2013, but are the market leader in that category.

Although not undervalued by any means, I think the stock is trading at fair/possibly slightly overvalued price right now with a current P/E of 19.5 and a forward P/E of 16.8. Looking back over the last ten years, SJM has traded between a P/E of 11.45 and 23.95.

Dr. Pepper Snapple Group (DPS)Thanks to Brian over at Dividend Mongrel for giving me this idea. DPS is a manufacturer and distributor of non-alcoholic beverages that are sold in the United States, Canada, and Mexico. The company’s brands include its flagship Dr. Pepper and Snapple drinks, Sunkist soda, 7UP, A&W, Canada Dry, Crush soda, Hawiian Punch, Mott’s, Schweppes, and my personal favorite as a kid, Yoohoo. Unlike its main competitors, Coca-Cola and Pepsi, both of which are trading at P/E’s of 19+, Dr. Pepper’s P/E comes in at 17.5 with a forward P/E of 15.2, both of which are less than the S&P 500’s current and forward P/E ratios of 18.3 and 17 respectively. Although they have only been growing their dividend for 5 years, the stock does sport dividend growth rates of 10.4% for the past year, and 22.8% average for the last three years while still keeping the payout ratio at 47%. While their current P/E of 17.5 is above their 5 year average of 14.9 since being spun off from Cadbury in 2008, I think we have to take in to account that the P/E stood at a low of 13.01 at year end 2009 due to the recession and bear market which skews the average.

Exxon Mobil (XOM)-I remember reading on The Conservative Income Investor a while back something to the effect of, when in doubt buy Exxon stock. 😉 In all seriousness though, the global oil giant and dividend champion is currently trading at a P/E of 13.9 with a forward P/E of 13.2. What most attracts me to a potential buy of Exxon right now though is the PEG ratio is currently at .9. The PEG, which was popularized by Peter Lynch compares the P/E ratio of a company to its growth rate. A PEG of 1 which is considered fair value by most investors indicates a stock is selling at a P/E equal to its growth rate. Exxon appears slightly undervalued here going by that metric. While not the flashiest of stock picks, Exxon has been and should continue to make for a great long-term dividend growth investment.

Deere & Company (DE)-Another stock that looks undervalued based on the PEG ratio. Although earnings are expected to decrease in the coming few years, I like the long-term growth story of this company which is summed up nicely at their investor page. After keeping their dividend static for five quarters, Deere recently announced a 17.6% increase, bringing the quarterly payout up to $0.60 from $0.51. Sweet. 🙂 Even after the recent run-up in price the stock continues to trade at an attractive valuation with a P/E of just 9.9.

And for some stocks I already own that I would consider adding to at current levels.

Target (TGT)-The dividend champion with 47 years of dividend growth continues to trade at a depressed share price due to the fallout from their data breach and difficult roll-out in Canada. After a very impressive 20.9% increase to their dividend announced last week, shares now trade at with a froward yield of 3.66%.

Visa (V)-Even though shares have run up a bit since my first purchase in April, the company is still trading at an attractive valuation, in my opinion, for those seeking to open a long-term position.

Disclosure: I am long TGT, V, and may initiate a long position in SJM, DPS, XOM, and DE in the coming weeks. Please my portfolio page for a full list of my holdings.

What do you think of these stocks? Are there any others you are looking to buy right now?

Monthly Investing Recaps: April 2014

At the start of each month I detail all my buy/sell activity for each of my 3 individual stock portfolios: Loyal3, Roth IRA, and Taxable Brokerage accounts. It’s just one way I am chronicling my journey to financial independence here at Starting From Zero.

In addition to these 3 accounts, I also continued investing in my Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) again this month. Right now I’m contributing 4% of my base pay but may adjust this in the future. The majority of my investing will still be in my taxable and Roth accounts. The TSP is basically a 401k plan for federal employees including the military. It only offers index funds but does have probably the lowest expense ratios around, even lower than Vanguard. Right now I’m putting my contributions in the C Fund which mirrors the S&P 500 and the S Fund which is a small cap index fund. Since these deposits typically take a while to reach my account, I won’t be detailing those transactions here.

With my tax refunds hitting my account this month I was able to invest more than normal as I put all of my refund into stocks. Here is what I did in April.

Loyal3 Account

Buys

7.72 shares of Coca-Cola (KO) @ $38.86 per share.

1.6361 shares of Target (TGT) @ $61.12 per share.

8.3479 shares of Target (TGT) @ $59.89 per share.

Sells

None.

Quick Hits: After receiving my tax refund this month I put all of my normal monthly investing capital to work here increasing my stake in Target. I plan on continuing to dollar cost average into KO as long as it remains at or below $40 as I would like this dividend champion to be a core holding in my portfolio.

Roth IRA

Buys

7 shares of Visa (V) @ $199.30 per share.

22 shares of Aflac (AFL) @ $61.00 per share.

Sells

None.

Quick Hits: I received a combined federal/state tax refund of just over $2800 which I quickly put to work initiating two new positions for my portfolio. I detailed my buy list recently and ended up going with Visa and Aflac. With its low yield it is easy to look at V as only a growth stock and not consider it as a dividend growth stock. However, the global payments processor now has a 7 year history of raising their dividend since going public and with a low payout ratio and high earnings growth figures to be able to continue doing so at a high rate in the future. With the shares dipping below $200, off a 52 week high of $235, and trading at a reasonable 25x earnings I started a position.

Aflac is a dividend champion in the insurance industry with a 31 year history of annual dividend raises. Due to currency concerns regarding their large amount of business in Japan, AFL is trading at a very attractive P/E of 9.

Taxable Brokerage

Buys

None.

Sells

29 shares of Powershares Financial Preferred ETF (PGF) @ $17.81 per share.

Quick Hits: This was one of my first purchases when I started buying individual stocks/ETF’s last year. I was attracted by the fund’s high yield and monthly payouts and not exactly understanding how preferred shares work, started a position. While the monthly payout is nice for individuals needing income today, I’d rather have more growth so I sold all my shares this month at a little bit of a loss and reinvested that money in my Loyal3 account.

 

Full Disclosure: I am long AFL, KO, TGT, and V. This post is not intended to be a buy or sell recommendation on any stock or ETF mentioned and is designed for educational/entertainment purposes only. Only you are responsible for your investing and I always encourage you to conduct your own research prior to investing. Please see my disclaimer page for more information.

How was your April for investing? What do you think of my buys/sells for my portfolio? Share with a comment below and thank you for reading.

Updating My Potential Buy List: April 2014

Good morning fellow dividend growth investors and personal finance enthusiasts!

Today I’m reviewing some of the stocks on my potential buy list. I recently got my tax refund back so it’s time to go shopping for stocks. 🙂

I’ve broken the list down into two parts, stocks that I already own and would like to add more to, and stocks that would be new additions to my portfolio.

First off, the stocks I currently own and would consider adding to.

Coca-Cola (KO)-As long as KO trades at less than $40 a share, I plan on continuing to dollar cost average using my commission free Loyal3 account.

General Electric (GE)-With a P/E of 17.3 I think GE is trading at fair value and I’d like to add more to position in the stock. With an increased focus on returning to its industrial roots and reducing the size and spinning off portions of its financial arm the company looks to be returning to its former dividend growth blue chip status.

McDonald’s (MCD)-Although shares have popped a little since my last purchase, I’d like to add more on a pullback as I have just a small position. While MCD doesn’t have as much of a margin of safety in the share price as I’d normally like, with a very long-term investing horizon, I feel comfortable paying up a little for a quality stock as I detailed here.

Philip Morris (PM)-Even though the price has rebounded a bit since my last Buy List post, the international tobacco giant continues to trade well below its 52 week highs and currently yields 4.5% at today’s levels.

Target (TGT)-This stock continues to be punished after a weak roll-out in Canada and the data breach during the last holiday shopping season. Like KO, I plan on continuing to dollar cost average into this stock using Loyal3.

Now for stocks that would be new additions to  my portfolio.

Aflac (AFL)-The insurance dividend champion continues to trade at an attractive valuation with a current P/E of just 9.1. With its strong dividend growth rates AFL should make a great long-term holding and also give me some exposure to the financial sector since I recently sold my shares in Powershares Financial Preferred ETF (PGF).

General Mills (GIS)-Man, I so wish I had just bought this when I was starting out and it was trading in the low 40’s. I’m still waiting for a slight pull back before initiating a position as the diversified food company continues to trade at a premium to its historic P/E but with a long-term investing horizon I may consider adding it if it dips below $50.

Kinder Morgan Management (KMR)-I recently purchased KMI in my Roth IRA last month. Rather than adding more to this position I was thinking of adding Kinder Morgan Management. KMR provides a similar yield to Kinder Morgan Partners (KMP), the master limited partnership, and issues stock dividends so you don’t have to worry about dealing with a K-1 come tax time. Once you decide to sell your position, you are given a 1099 just like with regular dividend growth stocks. Since it is structured as an LLC C-Corp it can be held in a retirement account so I’m thinking of adding this to my Roth to shield those future capital gains.

Visa (V)-Wait, what? Isn’t Visa a growth stock, I thought you were a dividend growth investor? 😉 With its low yield (currently less than 1%), it’s easy to look at V as only a growth stock and forget that it now has a 7 year history of raising dividends and a very impressive dividend growth rate as well. It currently sports dividend growth rates of: 40.4% for 1 year, 38.3% for 3 year, and 45.9% for its 5 year average. With shares pulling back below $200 a share recently, off from a 52 week high of $235, Visa looks attractively valued at today’s levels for starting a long-term position.

Full Disclosure: I am long KO, GE, KMI, MCD, PM, TGT, and may initiate long positions in AFL, GIS, KMR, and V over the coming weeks. For a full list of all my holding please visit my portfolio page. As always don’t take anything I post here as a buy or sell recommendation and I highly encourage you to do your own research before investing.

What do you think of these stocks? Do you hold any of these in your portfolio or looking to add them? Let me know in the comments! 🙂

Monthly Dividend Income: March 2014

My favorite post to write each month. 🙂 This when I get to share all my dividend income from the previous month. These dividends are what I’ll eventually use to live off of when I become financially independent.

Here is March’s dividend income from my 3 stock investment accounts: Brokerage, Roth IRA, and Loyal3. I collect all dividends in my taxable brokerage account as cash and manually reinvest them along with new contributions each month either in the same account or into my Loyal3 account. All dividends are automatically reinvested in the Roth.

Dividends Received

Brokerage: $46.59

BP (BP): $9.69

Chevron (CVX): $5.00

International Business Machines (IBM): $8.55

Powershares Financial Preferred ETF (PGF): $2.63

Realty Income (O): $19.86

Target (TGT): $0.86

Roth IRA: $25.72

Chevron (CVX): $10.16-reinvested into .088 shares @ $114.42 per share.

Realty Income (O): $2.79-reinvested into .065 shares @ $42.41 per share.

Royal Dutch Shell Class B (RDSB): $12.60-reinvested into .177 shares of Royal Dutch Shell Class A (RDSA) @ $71.09 per share. This comes out to $12.58 so not all of it was reinvested as RDSB cannot be dripped back into its own shares, only the class A version. An almost equal amount of RDSA is purchased commission free if you choose to reinvest RDSB dividends. Not sure how they come up with the amount, both times I’ve received dividends from this stock its been within 2 cents, one way or the other. These fractional class A shares will also produce dividends which can be dripped into class A shares as well. Weird huh? 😉

Royal Dutch Shell Class A (RDSA): $0.17-reinvested into .002 shares @ $71.09 per share.

Loyal3: $0.36

Target (TGT): $0.36-used as part of purchase in McDonald’s (MCD). Loyal3 dividends are collected in a cash account and applied toward your next purchase automatically when you use a debit/credit card.

March Total: $72.67. March was officially “Big Oil” month for me with all of my oil majors-CVX, BP, and both RDS’s returning cash to shareholders. About a 10 buck increase overall from February which puts me at 171.12 for dividend income year to date which is 17.1% of my 2014 goal of $1000.

 

Full Disclosure: I am long CVX, IBM, TGT, O, BP, PGF, RDSB, RDSA, and MCD. This post is not intended to be a buy or sell recommendation on any stock mentioned and is designed for educational/entertainment purposes only. Only you are responsible for your investing and I always encourage you to conduct your own research prior to investing. Please see my disclaimer page.

How was your March for dividend income? Do you have any dividend income goals you are trying to reach this year?

Monthly Investing Recaps: March 2014

At the start of each month I plan on detailing all my buy/sell activity for each of my 3 individual stock portfolios: Loyal3, Roth IRA, and Taxable Brokerage accounts. It’s just one way I am chronicling my journey to financial independence here at Starting From Zero.

In addition to these 3 accounts, I also started investing in my Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) again this month to help put more of my money in tax advantaged accounts. Right now I’m contributing 4% of my base pay but may adjust this in the future. The majority of my investing will still be in my taxable and Roth accounts. The TSP is basically a 401k plan for federal employees including the military. It only offers index funds but does have probably the lowest expense ratios around, even lower than Vanguard. 😉 Right now I’m putting my contributions in the C Fund which mirrors the S&P 500 and the S Fund which is a small cap index fund. Since these deposits typically take a while to reach my account, I won’t be detailing those transactions here but will now be including a total on my portfolio page.

I also received a surprise check from my college late in March with a tuition refund of $721.50 which was from me overpaying my tuition bill for the last 3 semesters before some of my scholarships were deposited. I knew I was getting a refund at some point but had completely forgotten about it. 🙂 I put this money to work immediately, combining it with most of the cash in my Roth to initiate a new position in Kinder Morgan Inc (KMI) which was one of the stocks on my buy list that I highlighted here.

Loyal3 Account

Buys: 03 Mar: 7.6296 shares of Coca-Cola (KO) @ $38.01 per share.

19 Mar: 2.0854 shares of Target (TGT) @ $59.94 per share.

19 Mar: 3.0985 shares of McDonald’s (MCD) @ $96.82 per share.

19 Mar: 1.297 shares of Coca-Cola (KO) @ $38.55 per share.

Quick Hits: Similar to last month as I continue dollar cost averaging into both Coke and Target. Looking to diversify a bit more this month I added McDonald’s, a dividend champion with 38 years of dividend growth. With a P/E of 17, I consider the stock to be fairly valued and will likely continue to add to my position in the coming months.

Roth IRA

Buys: 31 Mar: 33 shares of Kinder Morgan Inc (KMI) @ 32.13 per share.

Quick Hits: I combined some fresh capital this month with the cash I had just sitting idle in my Roth and finally pulled the trigger on KMI with the energy giant trading at an attractive valuation relative to its 52 week trading range. At current prices the stock boosts a dividend yield of 5.10% and is expected to be able to grow that dividend by 8% annually. Like all of my Roth holdings, the dividends received will be automatically reinvested. I plan on doing a full blog post on KMI here soon.

Taxable Brokerage: No buy or sell activity this month.

Overall a pretty solid month of investing. Combined all of my purchases this month added $78.62 to my projected annual dividend income. With the purchase of KMI, this puts me slightly overweight in the energy sector and will most likely be my last energy pick-up for a while. (Unless of course, another bargain presents itself next month. 😉 ) With a relatively small portfolio, I’m comfortable being overweight in certain sectors or stocks (like Realty Income) at the moment knowing future additions will help balance it out in the coming years. Once I get closer to financial independence, portfolio allocation is going to become more important. Until then, I plan on continuing to add whatever stocks are trading at fair value (or below) and meet my guidelines.

 

Full Disclosure: I am long KO, MCD, TGT, and KMI. This post is not intended to be a buy or sell recommendation on any stock mentioned and is designed for educational/entertainment purposes only. Only you are responsible for your investing and I always encourage you to conduct your own research prior to investing. Please see my disclaimer page.

How was your March for investing? What do you think of the additions to my portfolio? Share with a comment below and thank you for reading.

Target’s Credit Rating Cut, Are You Concerned?

Being a long-term investor with almost 20 years until I plan on retiring, I usually don’t give much stock to short-term issues and news that comes from my stock holdings. However I do subscribe to Seeking Alpha’s market current alerts so I can keep up with all the goings on with my investments. The majority of them don’t influence me much but are good to know to keep up with what my stocks are doing like acquisitions, share offerings or buyback announcements, and of course my favorite: dividend announcements, particularly those increase ones. 🙂

Yesterday I received this one in my e-mail: S&P cuts Target’s credit rating. The rating was cut from A from A+ due to a weak 4th quarter, which was highlighted by the data breach at their stores, resulting in 40 million payment card records being stolen. This combined with a more difficult than expected roll-out in Canada has dropped the stock from its 52 week high of $73.50 to its current $59.98 as of the close of Friday’s trading.

Since the data breach and weak 4th quarter results analysts and financial writers all over the internet have started predicting the eventual demise of the company. Although the short-term doesn’t look that great for the retail giant, I’m more concerned with where the company is going to be 5-10 years and more from now.

Despite having earnings fell to $3.07 in 2013 from $4.52 a year prior, free cash flow per share actually increased from $3.09 to $4.78, which is enough to cover the dividend and continue their 46 year history of raising the dividend. The increase in free cash flow per share is partly due to the firm’s share buyback policy which over the past decade has reduced the share count from 912 million in 2005 down to 642 million at the end of 2013. With earnings likely to be impacted in the short-term I expect them to slow down on the buyback so they can continue returning part of their free cash flow to shareholders. Their dividend growth should still be decent considering they had been increasing dividends by 21.4% over the last ten years. Even if it drops by half of that, I would still be happy as it would still be quite a bit above the rate of inflation.

Overall I believe Target (TGT) to be a buy today at these levels and I plan on continuing to dollar cost average into the stock in the coming months. As a dividend growth investor with a long-term investing horizon, I try not to worry too much about the short-term ups and downs of a company’s performance. Very few firms will ever grow linearly and never have any issues. A credit rating cut doesn’t look good for any company, but even with it, Target still has a good rating and one that is investment grade. Even though the Canadian expansion may not be going as well as hoped, I like that the firm is not standing pat and resting on their laurels and still looking to grow their business to better compete with others in their sector, like Wal-Mart (WMT).

While not a core holding for my portfolio, Target is one that makes a good complement to my other holdings and one I plan on holding a long time. Here are some links to places to further research Target and some recent blog posts on the stock if you want to look into the stock further.

Morningstar: Target

Reuters: Target

Why Did I Purchase this Dividend Paying Company For a Third Month in a Row? by Dividend Growth Investor

Recent Buy: Target by Dividend Mantra.

4 Reasons Why I Added Target To My Portfolio by Detail Investor @ Seeking Alpha.

Full Disclosure: I am long TGT and WMT. Please see my disclaimer page and do not take anything I said here as a recommendation to buy any stock. Always do your own research before buying.

What do you think of Target as a dividend growth investment? Do you have currently hold it in your portfolio and are you looking to add more with the recent weakness? Let me know in the comments below.