Portfolios

Here are my 3 portfolio’s: Taxable Account, Roth IRA, and Loyal3. I’ll be updating this page after I do my Monthly Investing Recaps at the beginning of each month.

 

Full Disclosure: I am long all stocks listed above. Please see my Disclaimer Page.

What do you think of my portfolios? Do you invest in any of the same stocks? Please leave a comment below.

21 comments

    1. Jayanth,

      Last year after O’s pullback to to tapering announcements by the Fed, I considered it fairly valued and looking to add some higher yield stocks to my portfolio, decided to load up. When a stock I like trades at a valuation I’m comfortable with, I tend to buy a lot of it. While I’m really over weighted in the stock right now, by the end of the year it should be more balanced out as I continue to add to other positions and open new ones. Being in the early years of the accumulation phase, I’m fine with being overweight in some stocks/sectors now knowing it’ll gradually balance out in the future.

      Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

      Best wishes,
      SFZ

  1. SFZ,

    I know the title of this page is “Portfolio” so you may be not including it, but do you have an emergency savings account?

    Brandon
    ~Military Finance Report

    1. Hi Brandon,

      I do have an emergency fund which I keep in a regular savings account separate from my investments. I keep it at 4500 which is about 6 months of my current expenses right now as I’m still living in the dorms.

      Thanks for the question sir.

      Regards,
      SFZ

      1. SFZ,

        Geez, you are spot on with your financial plan. I was a little slow to fill in the check blocks, but I eventually got on the right path. Keep it up.

        Brandon
        ~Military Finance Report

        1. I will sir. Hopefully my financial plan is solid, I’m completely committed to doing everything I can so I can retire early.

          Thanks for commenting,
          SFZ

  2. I like how your portfolio is not too agressive smply chasing yield. It has a good combo of current yield with some great dividend growers. Nice balance.

    1. Thanks for commenting Keith. I invested quite a bit in higher yielding stocks last year (O, RDS.B, T) to give me some more income to reinvest with initially and now plan on adding stocks with around a 2-3 % yield and 8-10% growth along with a few higher growth names here and there like my Visa position. With a long time to go before trying to achieve financial independence I can afford to not chase yield so much and let positions slowly build up to a high YOC.

      Best wishes,
      SFZ

  3. Great job…it looks like you are building your dividend portfolios quite nicely. By the way, I like the colors and simplicity of your charts. Very easy to follow and to the point. Keep it up.

    Wishing you continued success on your personal journey!

    1. Thanks, they are coming along slowly but surely. For the charts, I originally wanted to add in more info like current P/E, 52 week ranges, etc., but didn’t due to the fact I’m still learning about Google drive and how to incorporate it into my blog. But it does fit with the simple/minimalist type theme I’ve got going on here.

      Thanks for the comment.
      Best wishes,
      SFZ

  4. Our portfolios – both in companies and size – are very comparable. I think V is overpriced. I’m feeling lackluster on DE, although their brand recognition is unbelievable which is worth something.

    Keep up the great work.

    Wallet Engineer #1

    1. Yeah V wasn’t a normal buy for me. Usually I prefer to buy companies with P/E’s below 20 but with their growth rate, great balance sheet, and business model it was worth paying up a little for. Even though V has a low yield they have the potential to deliver large dividend increases going forward.

      The John Deere brand is one of the big reasons why I like the stock as well as their potential long-term growth story. I imagine the stock price will be fairly volatile here over the short-term with decreased earnings expected but I think current prices represent a decent value for an entry point for a long-term investment.

    1. Thanks Sam! Now if only I can get my google doc to display all the portfolio numbers. 😉

      I’m a fairly conservative person so I guess that reflects in my stock and financial decisions. I like to stick to companies that I’m completely comfortable with and plan to own for a very long time. Really the only aggressive position I have right now is Visa but I really like their earnings growth and in turn dividend growth potential going forward.

      Just checked out your site and portfolio, cool stuff man, I’ll have to add your blog to my reading list.

      Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

      Best wishes,
      SFZ

      1. I see you invest a lot in individual stocks. How do you handle the commissions (besides loyal3) and doesn’t it take a big chunk of your money? Also. Do you focus on maxing out your 401 and Roth before investing in a brokerage account? Thanks!!

        1. Brad,
          I typically try to save up $1200-1500 before making a purchase so that the commission is less than half a percent of the transaction. Due to my goal of retiring early I focus primarily on investing in taxable accounts so I can easily access my money prior to the 59.5 age requirement of most retirement accounts.

          Thanks for reading!
          -SFZ

    1. Youngdiv,

      When O moved into my buy range, I had already almost maxed out my Roth, so I just bought it in a taxable account along with a small Roth buy. Since I’m in a low tax bracket, I’m not too concerned with the taxes on O yet. When you say you moved O to your Roth, did you actually transfer the shares or just sell, then re-purchase in the Roth. I didn’t think you could fund a Roth with anything but just cash deposits. I’d be interested in transferring my shares over to the Roth, just wouldn’t want to sell and incur capital gains taxes, commissions, etc, just to buy it back.

      Best regards,
      SFZ

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